Where airplanes
land, opportunity takes off

U.S. airlines play an essential role in your world and America’s economy.

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U.S. airlines operate an average

27,000
flights

a day across the globe

800+

Airports served
around the world

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Member Airlines

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The U.S. airline industry employs more than

700,000 employees,

or about 75 people per aircraft.*

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Including direct employees, the U.S. airline industry supports more than 10 million jobs throughout the American economy.
*Breakout of employees by workgroup based on data reported to the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics by Alaska, Allegiant, American, Delta, Hawaiian, JetBlue, Southwest, Spirit, United and Virgin America.

James Pepe

Ramp Lead and U.S. airline employee for over 15 years

U.S. airlines ship

50,000 tons of goods every day.

  • Precious Cargo

    Whether you’re shipping live crabs to Kansas or fresh-cut flowers to Connecticut, U.S. airlines have you covered when time is of the essence. Fruits, flowers and vegetables were some of the first items to be shipped by air, and now we’re doing it better than ever with climate-controlled cabins, cost-effective packaging and secure handling techniques.

  • Live Animals

    U.S. airlines ship all kinds of precious cargo, but the term truly applies when our members transport living, breathing animals. We’ve been flying animals since the early 1930’s, and today it’s considered the most humane method over long distances. When our airlines transport passengers like Giant Pandas, pardoned turkeys and, of course, your pets, their well-being is priority number one.

  • Medical Supplies

    From pharmaceuticals to high-tech equipment, medical resources are only helpful if they’re in the right place at the right time, uncompromised. That’s why the U.S. airlines take every precaution when transporting critical medical supplies. Flights with the callsign “Lifeguard,” for example, may be transporting patients, organs or other high-priority cargo. Modern healthcare relies on access, and no one can provide access like the U.S. airlines.

  • Air Mail

    About 340 billion letters and 6.7 billion packages are signed, sealed and delivered each year—many with the help of the airlines. E-mail may have decreased the overall number of letters being sent by mail, but e-commerce has had the opposite effect on packages. Thanks to the airlines, online shopping has become an everyday convenience with 70 percent of Americans clicking “purchase” regularly.

Perishable Goods

Whether you’re shipping live crabs to Kansas or fresh-cut flowers to Connecticut, U.S. airlines have you covered when time is of the essence.

Live Animals

U.S. airlines ship all kinds of precious cargo, but the term truly applies when our members transport living, breathing animals such as Giant Pandas, pardoned turkeys and, most importantly, your pets.

Medical Supplies

In addition to equipment and pharmaceuticals, U.S. airlines ship emergency medical resources. Flights with the callsign “Lifeguard,” for example, may be transporting patients, organs or other high-priority cargo.

Electronics

It’s no surprise that we rely on electronics every day for communication, business or entertainment. What may come as a surprise is how much those electronics rely on the U.S. airline system for production and distribution.

Every day, the U.S. airline industry serves more than 2 million passengers.

Making New Opportunities

"I was here for a job interview and now I’m flying back to Alabama."

- Allison Holt

Bringing Family Together

"I would love to fly my four-year-old daughter and my wife to Ecuador. It’s where I was born..."

- Jose Tutiven

Opening Up The World

"...I flew back from China where I was leading a trip for a group of high school students from the U.S."

- Kim Wheeler

is the safest form

Commercial air travel

is the safest form

of inter-city transportation in the United States.

Thanks to the collaboration and effort of our member airlines, it’s never been safer to travel by sky.

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Member Airlines

Associate Member Airline

James Pepe

U.S. Airlines Marshaller of 15 years

Hi, I’m James Pepe, a ramp serviceman for United Airlines. I love my job because I work with some great people who make sure to provide the best service for our customers—not to mention the added benefit of traveling anywhere in the world at any time.

As Ramp Lead, I’m in charge of my gate crew, making sure everyone does their part loading and offloading flights on time. My team and I lift hundreds of thousands of pounds in baggage, freight and mail every day, while remaining constantly aware of the safety concerns that come with working around heavy equipment.

I was born in Honolulu, Hawaii and I’m of Samoan decent. I moved to California when I was five years old and never left. My wife and I have three kids. When I’m not managing my gate crew, I’m coaching my daughter in volleyball and my sons in football. My job means everything to me. It’s what I love to do and what takes care of my family. I am grateful for United Airlines.

Safety Checklist

In addition to various levels of maintenance checks, pilots and flight attendants conduct mandatory safety inspections before every flight.

Exterior Walk Around

Tire pressure

Wing conditions

Engine conditions

Cockpit pre-flight inspection

Flight instruments

Navigational computers

Warning systems

Radios

Cabin safety inspection

Smoke detectors

Fire extinguishers

Public address system

Cabin lighting

Allison Holt

I was here for a job interview and now I’m flying back to Alabama. I’m a graduate student at Auburn. I did my undergraduate there as well, in software engineering. My school is really awesome. You know, everybody talks about the Auburn family and some people think that it is a marketing or advertising scam, but it’s not! It has this great community atmosphere.

Jose Tutiven

I would love to fly my four-year-old daughter and my wife to Ecuador. It’s where I was born, but neither of them have ever been there. I can’t wait to go back and show them my home. My grandmother still lives there. She’s 104 and will be 105 next August. I’m hoping to plan a trip for her birthday!

Kim Wheeler

I’ve been traveling a lot over last year or so. I was living in Alaska last winter where I learned to snowboard. Then over the summer, I did a month-long road trip through California and the west coast, or as they say, ‘the best coast’.  Most recently, I flew back from China where I was leading a trip for a group of high school students from the U.S. It was a community service trip, but we definitely had some adventures while we were there too. I really tried to emphasize the language and the culture to the students. I love my job and sharing my passion for travel with the kids!